The Week in Website Performance News

This Week in Website Performance is a weekly feature of the blog. It summarizes recent articles about website performance. How to make your web site better, how to improve your users experience when they come to your website and how to optimize the overall experience. Why? Because your friends at care.



State of the Union: Ecommerce Page Speed & Web Performance [INFOGRAPHIC]

Author: Tammy Everts


This set of infographics crystallizes Radware’s recent release of its “State of the Union for ecommerce web performance.” Some of the key findings are:


The median top 100 retail site takes 5.4 seconds to render primary content, and 10.7 seconds to fully load.


The median top 500 page is 1510 KB in size (38% bigger than the 1095 KB measured in 2013), while the median top 100 page is 1667 KB (66% bigger than the 1007 KB measured in 2013).


While 75% of sites use a CDN to cache static resources closer to end users (thereby improving server round trip time), most sites don’t take full advantage of other optimization best practices, such as image compression and progressive image rendering.


The infographics also highlight Time to Interact and load times for the twelve fastest retail sites. If you want to know what’s happening in the world of retail website performance and load times then this is a must read resource.



Tips On How To Improve The Performance Of Your Website

Author: Duncan Lancer


As this article makes clear, there are a number of useful tips that website owners should apply to ensure their site is running as optimally as possible. For example, choose a solid hosting provider, install a solid theme, use the right plugins and delete unused ones, and perhaps most importantly – update old code. A final tip to consider is this: “There is nothing that slows down the performance of a website than a code written ten years ago. Although, you may not be able to update all the content on your site, you should ensure that all of your core files are up to date.”



Speed Up Your WordPress Site with Lazy Load Tools

Author: Tom Ewer


This article showcases a collection of plugins that use a concept called “lazy load” to reduce overall page load times. The concept works by only loading certain page elements when they become visible in your browser. Some of the WP tools called out in this article are:


Lazy Load plugin, which downloads images only if the user scrolls down in the browser


jQuery Image Lazy Load WP – adds straightforward JQuery lazy loading to your images


Rocket Lazy Load – same concept as above except it works by cutting down the number of HTML requests required to load a page


Lazy Widget Loader postpones widget loading until they’re within your screen viewport, but this feature lets you pick and choose which widgets will load first


The main takeaway here is that Lazy Loading is a very useful technique for improving page load times and hence, improving your end-user’s overall experience at your site.



Linux-dash: Monitors “Linux Server Performance” Remotely Using Web Browser

Author: Ravi Saive


Linux-dash is a server statistics monitoring script written in PHP, which displays live stats on your server environment such as real-time updates of RAM, CPU, disk space, installed softwares, currently running processes, and more. This article provides a clear and straightforward set of instructions and screenshots to get you up and running in no time with linux-dash. While the platform is not an advanced monitoring tool like Collectl or Glances, Linux-dash is a lightweight and easy to deploy solution for your server monitoring needs.



New findings: Retail sites that use a CDN are slower than sites that do not

Author: Tammy Everts


Radware releases its quarterly report of load times and performance for the top 500 retails sites. Their primary concern is to uncover the time to render primary content, and whether or not using a content delivery network (CDN) helps pages render their most important content more quickly. Key findings from this recent report show that:


Pages are taking longer to serve primary content


Using a content delivery network (CDN) correlates to slower Time to Interact, not faster


CDNs cure some, but not all, performance pains


Front-end performance optimization picks up where CDNs leave off